Where It All Began

As a kid, Angela McCall loved reading a series of Usborne Puzzle books. Every double page spread had a puzzle, problem, clue or mystery to solve. If you got stuck you could flip to the back pages and read the clues. Eventually these gave way to 2D computer games on her Sega, then Sega Mega Drive, like Sonic the Hedgehog!

Usborne Puzzle Advenutres
Angela & Her Daughters

2D Point and Click Puzzle Adventure

As an adult around 4 years ago, at Christmas, Angela was sat playing app’s with her daughters on their kindles, when they stumbled across a 2D Point and Click Puzzle Game, each photo/image/scene, had a clue, objects to tap on, mysteries to solve. Essentially a modern day version of the books Angela read as a child.

Dust Off The Old Coding Skills

Angela trained to be a software developer at the time the “internet” was becoming a house-hold requirement. Back at the end of the 1990’s/early 2000’s the only way to have a website, was to have one built (code written) from the ground up, but as time progressed, DIY platforms like WordPress came along, letting anyone create their own website. Thus Angela’s need to “code” became redundant.

Code
Lua Programming

2D Puzzle Adventure Games

Having discovered these 2D point and click puzzle app’s Angela started to download, and play as many as she could, following the companies and freelancer’s that created them on their social media platforms. But she still didn’t really “know” the best way to code/build the games/app’s for herself.

FREE Open Source Tools and Resources

Then one day, following a conversation on a Facebook post, she saw the developer name Corona SDK as the gaming engine that allowed him to write the code, using the Lua programming language. This was all that was needed, doing a quick Google search Angela discovered, that the tools needed were free to download, and instantly set about “completeing” the tutorials.

Solar 2D Game Engine
About Teaching Kids to Code

Solar 2D

In 2020, Corona SDK became part of the open source community and MIT licensing, and changed it’s name as a result. Having started to design her own version of the Usborne Books as a 2D point and Click Puzzle Game, her eldest daughter had started to show an interest in using the Lua programming language to create her own Roblox games, and so thinking the easiest way to teach her, was via YouTube videos, this entire branch of the business was born!